Category: My Blog

How to coleman slide?

If you want to learn how to slide on a longboard, this is the place to start. This is how you start. The Coleman Slide is a move that comes from early surf-style bank skating when it’s used on a hill. If you want to be able to stop quickly and look good doing it, you need to have this move in your toolbox. Whether you are a carver, speedboarder, or slider, you should spend some time getting this on. It doesn’t matter if the wheels are soft or hard, and it works with any length of board. There’s no reason why you can’t do this with some practice. Having slide gloves will make sure you can get over any hill that comes your way.

Jorge Pernes, a member of the Lush team, is showing off here. He has goofy feet, which means that he skates with his right foot forward. The way Jorge does it is that he skates with his left foot forward. If you skate that way, you’ll plant your left hand and slide to the left. Take a look at how your front hand still goes down on the road. Then, your back arm starts the game.

It’s important to note that a lot of people learn how to slide by grabbing the rail. This looks easier and safer at first, but it actually makes it more difficult to start and stop the slide. This makes it more difficult to slide down and back up again. Even when you are already in the slide, you can’t use your free arm to steer with. Putting on leathers and a full-face helmet and going very fast will keep the board under you. If you’re just starting to throw your first coleman slides, we strongly recommend that you learn it the right way – without the grab! You’ll be less likely to get taken advantage of, you’ll have more control, and… it looks better, too! You can thank us when you do.

Cliff Coleman, a friend of ours, came up with this one. In his sixties, he’s still skating down the hill.

Get Ready

Speed up as you approach the slide. If you’re going faster than you feel comfortable, that might be about right. Keep your weight in the middle, bend your knees, and keep your posture relaxed.

Setup

Get ready to slide by making a small turn across the road.

Get Low Sit down

on your board. You should bend your knees and roll your back foot, but don’t back away from the slide. Keep your weight forward, over your front truck. If you go down the slide with confidence, you’ll be fine. When you get scared and back away from it, things can get weird.

Initiate

Place your front hand on the road, out in front of and to the side of your wheels, on the ground. It’s important to keep moving forward. Leaning back is a very common mistake for new skaters at this point. This causes the back wheels on your back to grip up so you get thrown off.

Let it Go.

When you start the slide, put some weight on your hand. Swing your free arm across your body to start. People who take Cliff Coleman’s slide class are told to hit an imaginary parrot that is sitting on their front shoulder. When you swing that arm, the more the board will turn. It will also be easier to get it to face the right way again. Keep your eyes on where you’re going, not where the board is aimed.

For as long as you want to, hold the slide out. If you do this correctly, your upper body will be facing sideways or backwards, and you’ll be looking over your back shoulder down the road. To slow down faster, hold the board sideways, and to style it out, go all the way around until you’re backwards! This is how to do it!

Bring it back.

In order to turn the board around, bring your free arm back down next to you. In this step, you’ll undo the twist that you made in your body in the previous step, and your legs and board will follow.

Next Step.

Go around the corner! Rather than putting your foot on the brakes and sliding into a corner “predrift,” try moving your speedboard in the opposite direction to slow down and keep the speed down.

Take some time to learn the toe side/back side equivalent, which is more intimidating but can give you more control and brake power. If that’s not enough, then you’ll also be able to set up for corners in both directions.

Some other fun ways to do this are to do it one-footed, or without putting your hand on the road. You can even turn around backwards with a coleman, but this takes a lot of speed and a very sharp corner.

How to clean skateboard wheels?

cleaning skateboard wheels

A skateboard isn’t a vehicle that can go on every surface. We glide through some oddities. It’s all in good humor. You may bash down crusty slopes in downtown and ride your favorite dirty skatepark. Finally, you’ll notice your wheels need a thorough cleaning. They didn’t pick up their dog. Because skateboards are susceptible to water and are exposed to street filth and grime, cleaning your wheels is more difficult than you think.

Our wheels have seen it all. Anything the city streets and dusty skatepark can provide. It keeps us on our boards. So we should adore them. They are near permeable surfaces. In the absence of a dishwasher, we intend to wash our wheels using soap. We’ll need to focus on the details and work hard.

We don’t want to do things that get our wheels filthy, as skaters know. Begin with a bucket of water or a sink. Second, be prepared to get soaked if you do it well. In six easy steps, any skater can clean their wheels. We’ve covered the basics and even how to maintain your wheels.

 

To begin, you’ll need:

  • A squeaky (table, floor, or counter)
  • A sink or a bucket
  • Soap and a towel to clean the area (optional)
  • There should also be a compartment for the wheels (optional)
  • Paper towels (always a good idea)

Wheels Cleaning

Cleaning your wheels makes a lot of sense. Some things are unclear. You’ll often start riding your board and then find something is wrong. Gum or soft, greasy wheels that can’t grip the skatepark cement may cause your bike to wobble and crash. Why does it matter? Your trip will be rough if they aren’t cleaned. You like the new wheels. Skateboarders have used these tried-and-true methods to maintain their wheels clean before taking them to a shop.

Dirt and wax may be removed by dragging skateboard wheels diagonally and crisscrossing across brick.

Skating gets your wheels heated, which helps them shed grit. Make sure the slope isn’t too steep. Observe!

Keep clean clothes: A puddle. Sandbox Jump off your board to save your wheels.

  • Check for any flat patches. If so, you’ll nearly always require new wheels to prevent a jarring ride.
  • Wheels! Like automobiles, your board might benefit from a redesign.

You’re ready to learn how to clean your skateboard wheels now that you’ve got the tools.

Step 1: Ensure Workplace Safety

Cleaning anything makes you filthy. This is particularly true for skateboards, which are mostly used on filthy cement. Make sure your workstation is organized. Most people imagine a level area with plenty of space to maneuver. Disconnect the wheels and bearings. You’ll need a safe location to store them. It also has a sink or a bucket of water, as listed above. Overall, you and the rest of the globe will be soaked. Use a towel to keep the area clean, or work outdoors or over the sink. Remember that we don’t want your board’s wooden deck or bearings wet. It all boils down to preparation.

Step 2.1: Remove the Wheels and Bearings.

This is the technical component of cleaning your wheels. Prepare your skateboard and equipment for wheel removal, then start removing them one by one. Remove all axle bolts. After removing a wheel’s bolt, insert your truck’s axle at a 45-degree angle into the bearing’s mouth. This will build a crowbar-like tool for removing the bearings. Each wheel has two bearings. Keep them protected. You should also clean your bearings now (highly recommended). To clean your four wheels, remove each wheel and bearing. Keep your bearings dry at all times.

Step 2.2: Clean your bearings.

It’s okay if you don’t like the 2B’s stealthy move. We let you clean your bearings here since you’ll need to remove them to clean your wheels. Putting your bearings in a cup of isopropyl alcohol while cleaning your wheels is a smart idea. A tiny adjustment may have a tremendous impact on how the wheels perform. This will help you move quicker and smoother. Check out our fast and simple how-to instruction on how to clean skateboard bearings! Both work.

Step 3: Wash Your Wheels.

A bucket or a sink would be useful for housework. You may be able to run them without one. Be prepared for a mess. Using Dawn dishwashing soap in a bucket or blocked sink might assist you clean your wheels and remove the bearings. This way, you can work faster. Remove the bearings from the wheels so the soap can start breaking away the muck. Despite our expectations, there was a lot of mud and debris in the wheel track. The dirtiest stuff is inside the wheels. After a bath, dry them with a cloth or paper towel. Inside, we’re ready to tackle the wheel track and sides. It’s critical that your skateboard wheels soak up enough water to readily scrape off the dirt. Then comes the most critical phase.

Step 4: Wire Brush the Gunk Off.

A wire brush isn’t easy to come by. Wire brushes are widely available at hardware and bargain shops. We’ve also linked to an Amazon.com wire brush. If you want to go all out, use an old toothbrush or grip tape. This vital step is as simple as it seems. After rinsing your wheels with hot water, use the brush to scrape off any debris. Let your wheels soak for a bit to get rid of the grime. You may need to keep applying Dawn dish soap to particular locations, but once your wheels are clean, you must wash away any soapy residue. Only soap won’t leave chemicals or make your wheels sticky. Once your wheels are clean, it’s time for step 5.

Step 5: Dry your skateboard’s wheels.

It’s critical to let your wheels dry after cleaning them. Wheels are porous, so when wet, they not only take up more dirt, but also make your ride less smooth. Also, make sure your wheels are absolutely dry before putting in your bearings and connecting them to the board (step 6). Your bearings will corrode, and water will make your deck slippery. This is why we created this How-To tutorial. Why did we do it? Unskilled skaters might ruin their boards by trying to clean their wheels. Make sure your wheels are completely dry before letting them sit in the sun. Use a cloth or paper towels. Putting on the wheels prematurely makes them heavier and slower.

Step 6: Reassemble your wheels and board.

Congratulations! Your skateboard wheels are almost clean. And we’re still there. Reassembling your board allows you to alter your wheels’ direction. Front wheels of skaters who choose fakie or switch stance may slant or curve. They skate a lot. If your wheels are really old and worn, you may have to leave them that way to maintain them straight. But rotating wheels may extend their life and improve performance. See our bearings instructions if you’re ready to reinstall your clean bearings. Reassemble your board as in Step 2. Once your skateboard is set up, inspect the wheels. You deserve a break after all your efforts. Make a day of it and go to your favorite skatepark or downhill run!

How to clean skateboard trucks?

A skateboard isn’t a vehicle that can go on every surface. We glide through some oddities. It’s all in good humor. You may bash down crusty slopes in downtown and ride your favorite dirty skatepark. Finally, you’ll notice your wheels need a thorough cleaning. They didn’t pick up their dog. Because skateboards are susceptible to water and are exposed to street filth and grime, cleaning your wheels is more difficult than you think.
Our wheels have seen it all. Anything the city streets and dusty skatepark can provide. It keeps us on our boards. So we should adore them. They are near permeable surfaces. In the absence of a dishwasher, we intend to wash our wheels using soap. We’ll need to focus on the details and work hard.
We don’t want to do things that get our wheels filthy, as skaters know. Begin with a bucket of water or a sink. Second, be prepared to get wet if you do it right. In six easy steps, any skater can clean their wheels. We’ve covered the basics and even how to maintain your wheels.
Let’s party!

To begin, you’ll need:

• A squeaky (table, floor, or counter)
a sink or a bucket
Soap and a cloth to clean the area (optional)
There should also be a compartment for the wheels (optional)
• Paper towels (always a good idea)

When You Clean Your Wheels

Cleaning your wheels makes a lot of sense. Some things are unclear. You’ll often start riding your board and then find something is wrong. Gum or soft, greasy wheels that can’t grip the skatepark cement may cause your bike to wobble and crash. Why does it matter? Your trip will be rough if they aren’t cleaned. You like the new wheels. Skateboarders have used these tried-and-true methods to maintain their wheels clean before taking them to a shop.
Dirt and wax may be removed by dragging skateboard wheels diagonally and crisscrossing across brick.
Skating gets your wheels heated, which helps them shed grit. Make sure the slope isn’t too steep. Observe!
Keep clean clothes: A puddle. Sandbox Jump off your board to save your wheels.
• Check for any flat patches. If so, you’ll nearly always require new wheels to prevent a jarring ride.
• Wheels! Like automobiles, your board might benefit from a redesign.
You’re ready to learn how to clean your skateboard wheels now that you’ve got the tools.

Step 1: Ensure Workplace Safety
Cleaning anything makes you filthy. This is particularly true for skateboards, which are mostly used on filthy cement. Make sure your workstation is organized. Most people imagine a level area with plenty of space to maneuver. Disconnect the wheels and bearings. You’ll need a safe location to store them. It also has a sink or a bucket of water, as listed above. Overall, you and the rest of the globe will be soaked. Use a towel to keep the area clean, or work outdoors or over the sink. Remember that we don’t want your board’s wooden deck or bearings wet. It all boils down to preparation.

Step 2.1: Remove the Wheels and Bearings.
This is the technical component of cleaning your wheels. Prepare your skateboard and equipment for wheel removal, then start removing them one by one. Remove all axle bolts. After removing a wheel’s bolt, insert your truck’s axle at a 45-degree angle into the bearing’s mouth. This will build a crowbar-like tool for removing the bearings. Each wheel has two bearings. Keep them protected. You should also clean your bearings now (highly recommended). To clean your four wheels, remove each wheel and bearing. Keep your bearings dry at all times.

Step 2.2: Clean your bearings  
It’s okay if you don’t like the 2B’s stealthy move. We let you clean your bearings here since you’ll need to remove them to clean your wheels. Putting your bearings in a cup of isopropyl alcohol while cleaning your wheels is a smart idea. A tiny adjustment may have a tremendous impact on how the wheels perform. This will help you move quicker and smoother. Check out our fast and simple how-to instruction on how to clean skateboard bearings! Both work.

Step 3: Soak Your Wheels.
A bucket or a sink would be useful for housework. You may be able to run them without one. Be prepared for a mess. Using Dawn dishwashing soap in a bucket or blocked sink might assist you clean your wheels and remove the bearings. This way, you can work faster. Remove the bearings from the wheels so the soap can start breaking away the muck. Despite our expectations, there was a lot of mud and debris in the wheel track. The dirtiest stuff is inside the wheels. After a bath, dry them with a cloth or paper towel. Inside, we’re ready to tackle the wheel track and sides. It’s critical that your skateboard wheels soak up enough water to readily scrape off the dirt. Then comes the most critical phase.

Step 4 :Brush the Gunk Off.
A wire brush isn’t easy to get by. Wire brushes are widely available at hardware and bargain shops. We’ve also linked to an Amazon.com wire brush. If you want to go all out, try an old toothbrush or grip tape. This vital step is as simple as it seems. After rinsing your wheels with hot water, use the brush to scrape out any debris. Let your wheels soak for a bit to get rid of the grime. You may need to keep applying Dawn dish soap to particular locations, but once your wheels are clean, you must wash away any soapy residue. Only soap won’t leave chemicals or make your wheels sticky.

Step 5: Dry your skateboard’s wheels.
It’s critical to let your wheels dry after cleaning them. Wheels are porous, so when wet, they not only take up more dirt, but also make your ride less smooth. Also, make sure your wheels are absolutely dry before putting in your bearings and connecting them to the board (step 6). Your bearings will corrode, and water will make your deck slippery. This is why we created this How-To tutorial. Why did we do it? Unskilled skaters might ruin their boards by trying to clean their wheels. Make sure your wheels are completely dry before letting them sit in the sun. Use a cloth or paper towels. Putting on the wheels prematurely makes them heavier and slower.

Step 6: Reassemble your wheels and board.
Congratulations! Your skateboard wheels are almost clean. And we’re still there. Reassembling your board allows you to alter your wheels’ direction. Front wheels of skaters who choose fakie or switch stance may slant or curve. They skate a lot. If your wheels are really old and worn, you may have to leave them that way to maintain them straight. But rotating wheels may extend their life and improve performance. See our bearings instructions if you’re ready to reinstall your clean bearings. Reassemble your board as before.  Once your skateboard is set up, inspect the wheels. You deserve a break after all your efforts. Make a day of it and go to your favorite skatepark or downhill run!

How To Clean Skateboard Bearings?

how to clean skateboard bearings

Over time, dust and grit can collect in your skateboard’s bearings and hurt your ability to shred some sick moves. Regular maintenance is important if you want your skate bearings to last. Minor difficulties may be resolved by pouring a few drops of lubrication over the outer surface of each bearing and spinning them. Luckily, the process is easy enough to do at home.

 Tips: 

  • People sometimes think that they need to clean their skateboard wheels, but they only need to clean their bearings.
  • If your skateboard bearings have metal shields, you won’t be able to clean inside them, but it’s still a good idea. Step by step, you can easily bring them back to life if they have rubber or no shields.
  1. Gather the materials you need.

This job needs to be done quickly so that you can get back on your board as soon as possible. To do this, you need the right tools at hand. Things You’ll Need is where you’ll find the things you need. You’ll also need a bearing pole.

  • Skate tool
  • Tray to storage hardware
  • Sharpener or safety pin
  • Rag or toothbrush
  • Solvent
  • Container or bowl for solvent
  • Bearing lubricant
  1. Take the skateboard’s wheels off of it, then put it back together.

A socket wrench, ratchet, or skate tool can be used to loosen the nuts that hold the wheels in place. Your board may need to be steady and you may need to apply a lot of pressure to get the bolts to come off.

  1. Remove the parts and store them in a safe place.

Working on your board can make it easy to lose or misplace a nut, washer, or other parts. To avoid this, you might want to put the parts you don’t need to work in a plastic bag.

It is important to have a bolt and one to two bearing washers for each wheel that is taken off.

  1. Take the bearings off of the wheels and put them in a new place.

The bearing will be in the middle of the wheel, and it will be round. Remove the wheels, and then use a screwdriver to gently pry out the bearings. You can also use needle-nose pliers to carefully remove the bearings, but be careful.

To put the wheel on the truck, put it on like you’re attaching it. Make sure only one bearing (out of the two for that wheel) goes on the truck, though. Then, with the help of the truck, push the bearing out.

  • Some boards have an extra spacer between the bearings called a speed ring, and it helps them go faster. After you free the first bearing, you should take this one off.
  • To remove a bearing, you can use something called a “bearing puller.” If you don’t have one, you can use a thick metal rod (thin enough to fit through where an axle usually goes through) and gently hit it with a hammer. However, this could damage the bearings, so you need to be very careful about what you do.

Clean the Bearings

1.Get rid of the big dirt and grime.

You should be careful when you do this. You do not want to grind dirt into the bearings. Clean the bearings with a dry rag or paper towel to get rid of all the visible dirt.

To help cut through the grime, put some solvent on a rag or paper towel, and rub it in.

  1. Make a solution to clean your body.

When you have a clean bucket or bowl, fill it up with acetone or a grease-cleaning solvent. Mineral spirits or rubbing alcohol do a good job, aren’t as harsh as some cleaners, and aren’t as expensive as some other cleaners. • If you decide to use acetone, make sure you wear gloves because this solvent is very strong. Keep in mind that not all of your roommates want you to use acetone. You may want to use a more gentle solvent instead of acetone. Wear gloves when you work with acetone!

It may take a little longer for the bearings to be clean if you use a milder solvent, like mineral spirits.

3. Bearing shield caps can be popped off at this point.

Use a pin, a paperclip, or the point of a knife to get the rubber shield off of the bearing. These caps usually come in black or red, but they can also be white or blue. You should be able to see small metal balls after you remove the cap. If you have trouble, try inserting the pointed object between the rubber cap and bearing housing, then gently pry until the cap comes free.

 

4. Soak the bearings in the solvent, and then put them back in.

Now the bearings are ready to be put in the cleaning solution. Five minutes: Swirl and then let them sit in the solvent for about ten minutes, then rinse them off with clean water.

  • If the grease solvent has darkened a lot, you might need to carefully drain the solvent and add some more to the bucket. Once they look clean, do this a few more times.

It’s time to get rid of the bearings and let them dry.

Before you remove the bearings, make sure there is a level, safe place where they can dry. A paper towel or rag should be placed on the ground. Remove the bearings, and let them dry for a long time.

Greasing and Putting the Bearings back together

1.Speed up the drying process.

To dry the bearings, let them soak in water for about 10 minutes Canned air can help speed this up. It’s time to spray some canned air into the bearing’s open side. In this case, if it doesn’t move, spin the bearing with your finger and then spray the air while the bearing is already spinning.

2.Spread the lubricant.

It is best to use lubricant that is made for skateboard bearings. You should only need two or three drops of lubricant in each of the two or three bearings. After applying the lubricant, spin the bearing to make sure the lubricant gets into every part of it.

  • Don’t use: cooking oil, motor oil, or anything else that could make the bearings get dirty or make them stick. It also doesn’t work well. WD-40 lasts for only a short time, and it can dry out the bearings and make the lubricant not work.
  • Instead, use a Teflon-based lubricant instead of one that is silicone-based.
  1. Change the bearing shields.

Keep an eye on the seal between the bearing shield and bearing. The shields should pop into place without too much trouble. Make sure there are no gaps.

  1. Put the bearings back in.

As far as you can, push each bearing firmly into the wheel with your finger so that it goes into the wheel as far as you can. When you push the wheel down on a skateboard truck as hard as you can, the bearings will come home to the wheel.

  • If your board came with a bearing spacer (speed ring), don’t forget to put this between the bearings in the same way you found it.

5.Fit the wheels back on.

Now that the bearings are in the wheels as far as they can be, put the wheels back on the trucks. This is how it works: One washer should go on each side of the wheel. It’s also important that the wheels move a little when they’re reattached, but not too much.

6. If the wheels don’t fit right, make sure they aren’t loose.

Tightening a nut too much can make it hard for the wheel to move. Hand-test each wheel. Spin each one to make sure it moves freely.

A wheel may not spin or be hard to spin if you loosen the bolt that holds the wheel on to the truck.

 

How to clean roller skates ?

After all the fun you have with your skates, they’ll get dirty. As it turns out, cleaning skates isn’t that hard. If you skate roller skates or ice skates, you shouldn’t have any trouble giving your skates a new look. This is true for both. All you need to get the job done is a few simple cleaning supplies and tools that are easy to find. Even if you don’t skate very often, you should still clean your skates on a regular basis. This way, your skates stay in the best shape possible.

  1. Wash removable liners in a washing machine and air dry them. Take out any removable liners from inside your roller skates or inline skates and put them in your washing machine. This will help them get clean. A gentle laundry detergent should be added to the warm water cycle in your washing machine. You can set the temperature to up to 30°C (86°F). To do this: Run the cycle, then hang up the liners to dry in the sun.
  • Make sure you don’t use any detergents or fabric softeners that could damage your liners.
  • Take care to keep your liner out of the way of heat sources while it dries.
  1. If your skates get wet, use a clean cloth to dry them off. Take your skates off after you’ve used them and put them on some newspaper to help them dry if they get wet from your sweat or from riding in wet weather. The outside of your skates must be completely dried off to be safe.
  • One way to get dirt and dust out of your skates’ crevices is to use a clean, dry brush.
  1. Use a wrench or hex key to remove the wheels from your skates. A nut or bolt with a hex slot in the head might hold your wheels to the axle. You can see this by looking at the hubs. Use a wrench to get nuts off, and a hex key to get bolts with hex slots in their heads off. Wheels off:
  • Roller skates usually use nuts to keep the wheels on the axles. Inline skates, like rollerblades, usually use bolts with hex slots in their heads to keep the wheels on the axles. To remove roller skate wheels, you need a wrench. To remove inline skate wheels, you need a hex key.
  • An Allen wrench or Allen key is also called a “hex key.”
  • Use a skate tool that has different wrench sockets and heads to remove skate wheels, as well.
  • You should clean your wheels and bearings every 1-3 months, or after 10 uses or so, to make sure they’re in good shape.
  1. Take the bearings out of the wheels using a bearing remover. Push the tip of the bearing remover tool into the middle of a wheel while you press the button on the back of the tool. This will remove the bearing from the wheel. Let go of the button, then pull the tool back out to get the bearing out of the way. For each wheel, do this. [4]
  • Keep the bearings out when you clean roller skates or inline skates so you don’t get them wet when you wash the wheels. This way, you won’t get them dirty.
  • A bearing remover can be bought at a skate shop or on the web.
  1. Soak the wheels in a container full of soapy water. All of the wheels should be submerged in a container of water and 2-3 drops of liquid dish detergent should be added to the water to clean them. Do this a few times to get the water to get the wheels clean. Wait until the dirt on their wheels starts to come off. Then, rinse them with clean water.
  • You can spray some window cleaner on the wheels and wipe them clean with a paper towel instead of having to soak them. This can also be done with the skates’ wheels.
  1. Wipe the wheels down with a damp paper towel and dry them off. Use paper towels to wipe down each wheel one at a time after they’ve been in the water. Using more dry paper towels, wipe off all the moisture from each wheel. Make sure all your wheels are clean and dry before you put your skates back together.
  • The old toothbrush can be used to scrub off any dirt that didn’t come off during the soaking process.
  1. Use Bearing Wash to clean and grease the bearings. Put the bearings in a small container with a lid. Cover them with bearing wash and put the lid on. It is time to wash the bearings. Put on the lid and shake the container very hard. Keep your clothes clean and dry your clothes with a clean, lint-free cloth. Each bearing should be lubricated with 1 drop of bearing oil.
  • You can buy both bearing wash and bearing lube at a skate shop or buy them on the internet.
  1. Put the bearings in the wheels, then put the wheels back on your skates and skate. When you get your bearing tool, you can put the bearings back in each wheel again. When you’re done, tighten the nuts or bolts back into place with your wrench or hex key.
  • It’s easy to change the wheels on your skates. They can go back to where they were. Put them on in a different order than they were before. This will help keep the wheels from getting worn down.
  • With your fingers, give each wheel a spin. Make sure they can move freely. As a last resort, you can just loosen the nut or bolt on that wheel by about 1/4 turn. This will give that wheel more freedom.

How to clean bearings with household items?

how to clean skateboard bearings

Every two to three months, as a roller hockey player, you should clean the bearings on your skates. It doesn’t take a lot of mechanical know-how to do this job either. Inline skate wheels can be cleaned at home with a little patience and the right tools. Before you do anything, make sure you have your tools, container, cleanser, and lubricant ready to go! Make sure you are working on a hard, non-porous surface before you start.

Clean your bearings with the help of the following things.

  • A work surface that is abrasive
  • A prying tool for the purpose of removing the bearing shields
  • A wheel tool with an inline design for removing the bearings
  • Purpose-built bearing cleaner and lubricant
  • A dry cloth or paper towel

When you want to clean your skate bearings, there are three simple steps you need to follow:

I.Skate Disassembly

1. Using an inline skate tool, remove the wheel from the skate.
Find two or three bolts that go through the middle of the skate wheel and the skate base. Skate tool: Put the end of the tool into the middle of the bolt and turn it counterclockwise. • An inline skate tool is a long, T-shaped piece of equipment with a strong handle and a thin, 4-mm-wide Allen wrench. You should be able to loosen and remove the bolts with little work. Some skate shops have them for sale. You can also buy them online.

  • If the wheel is held in place by two separate bolts, use two skate tools at the same time.
  • Keep the bolts in a separate container so they don’t get mixed up and get lost.

2. With the long end of your skate tool, pull the first bearing out of the wheel.
With one hand, hold the skate tool and the wheel. Tilt the skate tool 45 degrees and insert it into the center of the wheel with the blade facing the wheel itself. Use the tool’s long end to find the opposite side of the bearing. When that’s done, move the skate tool around a little bit so that the bearing comes out of the wheel. You can also use an in-line skate tool to take your bearings out of your skates. These are three-pronged tools for skates.
3. Take the spacer out of the center of the wheel, then put the wheel back on.
Examine your bearings for a small piece of metal that looks like a tube. You can use this to keep your skate wheels from sticking together when you change the axles. To get the spacer out, turn the wheel over and gently shake it out until it comes out.

  • Make sure that you separate the spacer from your screws.

4. Using the base of your skate tool, pry the second bearing off your wheel.
The skate tool was pushed through the hole in the wheel that was left when the bearing was removed at the start of the process. This is how to fix the skate tool: With your palm, firmly push on the handle of the skate tool. This should make the second bearing come straight out.
5. Use a thumbtack to remove the rubber bearing shields.
Rubber shields come in a specific color and fit very well around the outside of the bearing. You can use a thumbtack as a lever by putting the sharp end into the edge of the shield. Some time soon, the rubber shield should separate from the other parts of the bearing.
Remove the bearing shields from your other tools, like spacers and screws, so that you can work on them on their own.
6. With a thin, sharp tool, remove the C-ring to remove the metal bearing shields.
You can see it on the edge of the bearing. It’s made of metal, and it’s in the shape of a “C.”. Pry the ring open with the sharp end of the pointy tool and tap the bearing on a hard surface to dislodge the metal shield.

  • A thumbtack is an excellent tool for this.
  • Certain metal bearing shields may be sealed, making removal difficult. If such is the case, you may skip this step.

II.Bearing Soaking and Lubrication

  1. Fill an empty jar with your bearings.

Take a clean jar big enough to accommodate all of your bearings. It makes no difference whether they are face-up or face-down, as long as the bottom is flat.

  • Alternatively, an empty milk jug works nicely for this.
  1. Use a specific bearing cleaning to coat the bearings.

Directly over the bearings, pour the cleaner until they are totally saturated and immersed. You are not required to completely fill the container.

  • Clean skate bearings using a product formulated exclusively for skate bearings. This item is available for purchase online or at a dedicated skate store.
  1. Jiggle the jar to thoroughly clean your bearings.

Secure the lid of the jar firmly. Then, shake the jar vigorously. Continue shaking the jar until the cleaner seems dirty and grimy—this is a good indication that you’ve displaced a significant amount of dirt, oil, and grease. Then, pour out the used cleaning liquid, refill the jar, and shake vigorously again until the liquid remains clear.

  1. Empty the cleaner of the bearings and place them on a paper towel.

Put on gloves to avoid direct contact with the cleaning agents. After that, place all of the clean bearings on the paper towel.

  • Alternatively, you may lift and slide the clean bearings out of the jar using a thin, sharp item.
  1. Spin and tap your bearings to ensure they are free of debris.

Between your thumb and pointer finger, grasp each bearing. Begin rotating the wheel with your opposite pointer finger—ideally, the bearing should spin smoothly and freely. While you’re at it, tap the bearing on the paper towel to remove any remaining dirt, oil, or grease.

  1. Using a cloth and an air compressor, dry your clean bearings.

All bearings should be laid flat on the paper towel. Using a clean cloth, pat each bearing dry, and then spray a can of pressurized air straight into and around each bearing.

  1. Fill each bearing with 1-2 drops of bearing oil.

Then, using your fingers, rotate the bearings around to distribute the oil more evenly.

  • Bearing oil aids in the smooth operation of your bearings.
  • Skate bearing oil may be purchased online or at a speciality skate shop.

III.Reconstitution the Skates

  1. Replace the rubber protection above the bearing.

The seal should be centered squarely on top of the bearing, aligned with the grooves and edges. Then, using your fingers, firmly put the shield into place.

  1. On top of the metallic shield, replace it with the C-ring.

On top of the skate bearing, place the metallic ring. Then, reattach the C-ring to the top edge.

  1. Using your thumbs, insert the first bearing into the wheel.

With the bearing shield facing up, place it at the center of the wheel. Put your thumbs on each side of the bearing and firmly press to reinstall it.

If the bearing does not fully engage, use your skate tool to press it into position.

  1. Flip the wheel over and center the spacer.

Ascertain that the spacer is upright and sitting along the first bearing’s center.

  1. Using your thumbs, press the second bearing into position.

Place the bearing on the spacer, centered in the wheel. As previously, use your thumbs to reposition the bearing.

  1. Using bolts and a skate tool, reattach the wheel to your skate.

Reinstall the wheel in its appropriate location on your skate. With your skate tool (or skate tools), re-twist the bolts into place until the wheel feels snug and secure. As a last check, use your finger to spin the wheel to ensure that everything is operating properly.

  • Some skaters propose grouping your wheels according to their spin speed; in other words, place the slowest spinning wheels beside the quickest spinning wheels.

 

 

How to Clean a Skateboard Truck and Deck

Skateboard trucks and deck are particular parts that require regular cleaning and maintenance. Cleaning the parts will help keep these things working for a long time. Because this is about how to clean skateboard trucks and decks, you have to read it if you own a longboard as well. It’s almost the same way to clean those. A washed skateboard is necessary as it is going to encourage you to go for rides. There are many ways to clean. Let’s see how to clean both of them?

 

I.How To Clean Skateboard Trucks

tools needed:

  • A screwdriver with
  • Slip-joint pliers are tools that can be used to cut things.
  • WD-40 is a good thing.

Procedure:

STEP 1: As the skateboard truck is joined to the skateboard deck, you will have to detach this first. When you have the screwdriver and slip-joint pliers in your hands, start to loosen the nuts with them.

Unscrew every nut moderately so that you can do the rest by hand. Remove all of the nuts from the bolts and throw them away.

A lot of people are going to throw nuts away in a place that will be hard to find in the long run. So, keep nuts in a safe place that you know well. In the future, it will be easy to remember.

STEP 2: At this point, you should be done with removing nuts and choosing a decent shelter for them. Now is the time to separate the deck and the truck.

Use your hands to get the truck off. You should not pull too hard. Also, make sure that you looked at the kingpin outward.

STEP 3: This is a step that does not apply to all skateboard trucks. If you have a pair of trucks that come with risers, you also need to take them off now. Every skateboard truck doesn’t have a riser in it.

STEP 4: Time to clean. All but the baseplate must be taken off of trucks to get them apart and clean them. Remove the nut from the kingpin first, then you can remove the rest of it. Finally, remove the hanger from the base plate. Finally, remove all of the bushings.

STEP 5: Take a look at these parts. Find a crack. The first thing you need to do if one of these parts is broken or split is to buy a new one.

As long as everything is in good shape, spray a little WD-40 on a paper towel and wipe away any dirt and grime. High-pitched noises are made by your trucks because they have a lot of grime on them.

STEP 6: You have to clean those axles again. As a rule, the axle is the dirtiest of all of the parts of the car.

Take a second paper towel. Remove the last of the dirt from the axles. Bearings make the axle get all of this dust, so it gets it from there. Hence, make sure they are back to top-notch condition.

STEP 7: Do the same thing with the second truck. You will be ready to start reassembling after that. Keep in mind that you need to tighten Nuts and bolts to the correct amount.

It’s not good to over-tighten or to be too loose when you tighten things up. That’s not all: The kingpin must face outward after the meeting as well.

Pro Tip: When you go for your first ride after you wash your board, be careful when you speed up the board. A lot of the time is spent cleaning the car, which makes it go faster and faster.

II.How To Clean Skateboard Deck

Clean Skateboard Deck with Soft Brush Wire

tools needed:

Step 1: Buying a Soft Wire Brush

If you buy a soft wire brush at a store near you, make sure its bristles are strong and not sharp enough to cut the grip tape. Check to make sure that it is also small, because it can help you clean the grip tape on your skateboard with great precision. Don’t buy a lot of big ones, because they will only damage the grip tape on your skateboard deck.

Step 2: Brushing the Grip Tape

With the soft wire brush you just bought, start brushing your grip tape with it right away. Also, it would be best if you started at the end of the deck and worked your way around to the other side. So, you can get the dirt on the surface of your deck, and you can sweep it up with your hands. Remember not to push too hard with the soft wire brush in your deck, because it will only tear it. You should also not remove the grit from your board.

Step 3: Using Grip Gum to get rid of the extra dirt.

You can get some grip gum at your local skate shops because it’s made for skateboards only. You can use this cleaning product to get rid of any extra dirt on your deck after you use a soft wire brush to clean it. With a pencil eraser, rub it on the grip tape and then wipe it away. A perfectly done job will make your board look brand new.

Step 4: Drying it with Dry Cloth

After you finish removing the dirt in your deck with your cleaning solution and brush, start drying it with a dry cloth. If you have some microfiber cloth, it can do much better. First, place the cloth on your deck and start patting it to absorb the moisture. Fold the cloth and press it again through the deck up until its dry enough. Also, make sure that the wooden area at the bottom is dry too. Never use paper towels as it tends to break when you use it, and wit will only cause another mess.

 

How to choose longboard trucks ?

This is a sport that gets people excited. Longboarding is a sport that has fans and players from all over the world. Longboard surfers find it exhilarating and freeing to be out on the water.

You should choose your longboard gear just like you choose your sports equipment. You should think about what kind of longboard surfing you want to do when you choose your gear. Cruising, Freeride, freestyle, and downhill are some of the options you can choose from. As a surfer, you should choose your equipment based on your level of experience.

There are a lot of parts that make up a longboard, and each part has a specific job that affects how it feels to ride. During this post, we’re going to talk about longboard trucks.

 

What Should I Know About Longboard Trucks ?

There are metal T-shaped parts on the underside of the longboard deck that are fixed there and are connected to the wheels. This is what longboard trucks are all about: Every longboard comes with a pair of trucks, which help the board roll. The trucks on longboards and skateboards do the same thing, but the trucks on longboards are different from the trucks on skateboards because longboards are longer. People who skateboard have trucks that are a little wider than those for longboards because of the difference in the size of the deck. Longboard trucks can’t be used with skateboard trucks because longboard trucks are made for different types of boards. There are two ways to measure the length of trucks: hanger width and axle width.

There are a lot of different types of longboard trucks on the market, and it can be hard to choose one. That is why we are here. We can help you make your choice much easier. First, two big decisions need to be made.

 

  • Width of the trucks
  • Standard Kingpin (SKP) or Reverse Kingpin (RKP)

Let’s go into more detail about these two characteristics.

Truck Width

As a general rule, the width of your truck should be as close to the width of your deck as possible. In this case, it could be about 1/8″ away. If both the width of the deck and the truck are the same, you will be able to get the best out of your longboard. Because this way, your board’s leverage points will be in the right place with the truck and the wheels. if there is a little difference, it is better for the trucks to be on the wider side than the deck. This is why.

Companies make different trucks for longboards, and they use different units and scales to measure the width of the trucks they make. This can make it hard to find the right truck width for your longboard. If, for example, inches are used to measure, the length of the axle is usually taken into account. A millimetre may also be used to measure the width of the truck. Most likely, this refers to the width of the hanger, though. For example, most longboard decks are 9-10″ wide, so axles with a 9-10″ width and 150-180 mm hangers are the standard sizes for longboard trucks, as are the axles.

If you look at how wide each truck is, a wide axle or hanger makes it more stable but less responsive. A narrower truck is less stable but more responsive.

Kingpin: Is it standard or reverse?

The choice between the standard kingpin and the reverse kingpin depends on what kind of ride you want to go on.

It’s thought that Standard Kingpin or SKP trucks are the best for street riding because the kingpin is fixed behind the hanger, which makes it face toward the inside of the board. This setting doesn’t let the truck get in the way of grinding or doing other tricks. They are smaller in width than RKP, or reverse kingpin, which is what they are also called. Still, there are many companies that make SKP trucks that are wider than the ones that come with most longboards. These trucks work well with many of them.

RKP trucks are mostly used on longboards. They are more responsive at slow speeds and more stable at high speeds, which makes it easy to control them and keep them in line. For any kind of ride you want to go on, these cars have the right features for you. Mounted higher than the SKP, the RKP are facing the nose and tail of the board, which is why they are called RKP. There is a little less space between the RKP’s wheels because of this. Park longboarding and grinding are not your thing, so if you want to enjoy your Freeride, freestyle, and downhill surfing experience in a more stable and responsive way, then RKP is the board for you.

There are other important parts of a truck that are just as important and play a role in making the ride fun.

 

Baseplate

The baseplate connects the truck to the deck of the longboard. This is the part of the longboard that is made of wood. There is a big difference in how the trucks turn because the angle of the baseplate is so high. This Among RKP trucks, the baseplate is bent in half. This angle is thought to be best for carving, freestyle, and slow Freeride because it is very responsive to changes in speed. This type of baseplate is best for people who are just starting out. If you want to go fast in Freeride and downhill surf, you should get baseplates that are less than 50 degrees. It helps the rider to lean hard without over steering, which makes the ride more stable and controlled at high speeds.

 

Bushings

These urethane grommets help the hanger stay in place and give the truck some momentum as it turns. There are two pairs of bushings on each side of the hanger, top and bottom, so there are two pairs on each side. Bushings are made to cushion the parts of trucks that are close together. There is more of a difference between hard and soft bushings. A stiffer truck makes the rider lean more to turn. To make the trucks more responsive, the bushings come in a soft variety.

Bushing Seat?

It is a pocket in the middle of the hanger that makes it hard for trucks to turn. There are a lot of different types of bushing seats. Bushing seats that are wide open and don’t have a lot of restrictions will give your hanger more room to move around, which helps you carve in a lively and free way. To make it more stable when going at high speeds, the one has less space to hang things from.

Hanger

There is a T-shaped aluminum alloy beam that connects the truck’s wheels to the main body, which is made of steel.

Things to remember

They are not the same thing, so never use them together.

In general, a wider hanger gives you more stability and control over your ride. Narrower hangers help riders be more agile and manoeuvrable when they turn and do tricks.

 

how to buy a skateboard for a child

When purchasing a skateboard for a youngster, avoid purchasing a cheap toy skateboard, since they are dangerous. Allow your local skate shop to construct one for you, or purchase a whole skateboard online. A child skateboard should be between 7 and 8 inches broad and 27 to 31 inches long.

If you are unfamiliar with skateboards, avoid attempting to construct one yourself. Complete setups are great for children, since they prevent you from purchasing mismatched components.

The trucks should have the same width as the deck, and the wheels should fit snugly against the trucks while providing enough room to prevent the wheels from colliding with the skateboard when steering. Ensure that the skateboard you purchase allows for component replacement.

 

Complete Skateboard or Self-Assembled?

You may construct a skateboard yourself by purchasing the cheapest pieces from various sources, or you can purchase a full configuration to save time. Additionally, if you just choose the components and expect them to fit together, you may be disappointed. The trucks must have the same width as the skateboard deck, and the wheels must be compatible with the trucks.

If the wheels are too large, they will make contact with the deck, causing your youngster to topple over. Additionally, there is the issue of wheel hardness. For flat, smooth surfaces such as concrete skate parks, harder wheels are preferable; for street, asphalt, softer wheels are preferable.

With so many alternatives available, it’s simple to get disoriented and purchase the incorrect pieces. If you’re unfamiliar with skateboarding, you’re likely to just look at your child’s preferred color and attempt to match an appealing deck. While this is totally acceptable, it is critical to ensure that the components fit together properly.

Similarly to when you are shopping for new PC components, everything must be compatible. A desktop hard disk is not compatible with a laptop.

I’ve chosen a few skateboards that are ideal for children and are reasonably priced, depending on your budget. They are pre-assembled and include all necessary components. It’ll save you a lot of time and ensure that you don’t purchase the incorrect items.

Unless you’re interested in delving into the many components and what works best together, just get a pre-assembled comprehensive system. Additionally, it will spare you the bother of attaching the grip tape to the deck, which is challenging the first time. There should be no air bubbles or peeling grip tape around the edges.

 

Avoid Purchasing One from a Toy Store for the Safety of Your Child

I’ve previously written a piece on why you should avoid purchasing a skateboard from Walmart or Target. They are constructed of low-quality materials and are prone to break. Amazon also sells inexpensive (Chinese) and hazardous skateboards; for the protection of your children, please avoid the following Chinese ‘brands’:

While it may seem enticing due to its low price, you are not doing anybody a favor. A high-quality skateboard outlasts a poor board by more than eight times. Cheap skateboards are dangerous, and your child may suffer an injury if a wheel or truck breaks.

If you’re unfamiliar with the difference between a toy skateboard and a real one, consider the following:

  • They are always packaged as a full configuration in plastic.
  • The deck is often somewhat thicker than that of a traditional skateboard.
  • They are often extremely large.
  • The wheels hardly rotate and cease to do so after 1 or 2 seconds.

Most importantly, avoid bogus websites that mention a multitude of boards but do not utilize genuine images. They just want you to click over to Amazon so they may earn a commission. If they do not have genuine photographs, it is a fraud.

 

Recommended Skateboards

Santa Cruz

One possibility is a smaller skateboard, like my son’s. I chose the Santa Cruz Kids Skateboard. This is a decent skateboard. Santa Cruz is a premium skateboard company with a long history. We used it for 2 years and pushed it to its limits.

The OJ wheels are great for street skating, since they are soft and can take tiny pebbles and twigs. The soft wheels further minimize noise and vibration. I strongly suggest this board, however be aware that the visuals may vary.

Enjoi Skateboard

Enjoi has a large selection of skateboards with attractive designs for youngsters. What more do you want from a board with a cat on it? “Aw, a kitty on a pizza!” my kid said upon seeing the image. Enjoi is a respected company that makes pro skateboards.

 

It helps your youngsters steer and adjust posture without losing balance. The smooth wheels help manage the board on difficult surfaces.

Enjoi is a nice and safe pick with cute panda‘s, cats, and dogs.

Element

Element is another famous company that caters to youngsters. The softer bushings (plastic cones between the trucks) assist your youngster steer and make the board more responsive. Unlike many other kits, this one works straight out of the box.

The 95A/53mm wheels give a smooth ride without the noise that many cheaper skateboards create. This is a lot safer than those cheap plastic boards for your kids.

Magneto Mini Cruiser

The Magento Mini Cruiser is an excellent pick for youngsters, despite the low-quality bearings. Mini cruisers are made for riding, not for acrobatics. They have huge soft wheels that drive across tough terrain.

It’s too tiny for grownups, and you’ll need a skate tool to tighten the trucks. It took my child a few minutes to get acclimated to this board. A good value for money kid’s cruiser.

Team Positiv

A quality skateboard may be had for a cheap price. The Positive Team skateboard is one of the most recommended.

I believe it’s one of the best value beginner skateboards, but I think it’s a little broad for kids under 8 years old. My son and I tried this board and found it to be a good value for money.

Smooth riding, stable, can take a beating and rolls smoothly. The wheels are significantly tougher and do not instantly block when riding over cracks or stones.

SkateXS Skateboard

What do you need? Name on a skateboard? SkateXS has bespoke boards for both boys and girls. Their boards are made of bamboo, which is stronger and more eco-friendly. Not the cheapest, but one of the few that sells personalized skateboards for youngsters.

I appreciate that these skateboards are made for little kids. This implies soft wheels, a great deck, good bearings, and decent trucks. But most crucially, they can tolerate crusty asphalt, cracks and stones.

 

Arbor Pocket Rocket

The Arbor Pocket Rocket is a safe, sturdy, and enjoyable option. The very soft and huge wheels on this enjoyable mini cruiser let it to tackle practically any terrain.

My youngster loves this board, but I had a fantastic time riding it too, despite its little size. Here’s my child riding it:

It costs more than the other boards, but it has high-quality components that won’t break.

Avoid Mini Decks

In toy shops, little decks are the tiniest skateboards offered. They’re adorable but will end up gathering dust. They are unstable and potentially harmful. A buddy gave me one when my kid was born. We never utilized the excellent present.

But it’s a wonderful shot to demonstrate how unbalanced it is. I’m on the mini-deck, which I secured to a piece of grass to keep it from sliding. I even changed the wheels and bearings, but it didn’t help. But it’s a fun prop.

The Components of a Skateboard

To have a better understanding of what a skateboard is, take a look at the picture and the list below. All components are replaceable once they begin to fail.

  • A seven-ply maple hardwood deck. Compressed into a mold.
  • Grip tape to keep you from sliding off the deck
  • The T-shaped trucks on which the wheels are mounted. The truck is comprised of a baseplate that secures the truck to the deck, bushings that enable turning, and a truck hanger that keeps everything together.
  • Obviously, the wheels.
  • Bearings that enable the wheels to rotate.
  • Spacers to guard against damage to the bearings.
  • Bolts for securing the trucks
  • Optional riser pads to raise the wheels above the surface or just for dampening.

 Skateboarding Is a Great Form of Exercise and a Lot of Fun

Skateboarding is a beneficial kind of exercise. Children get to engage in some physical exercise, which is important as they get older. It helps them build muscle and enhances their motor abilities. Nowadays, children watch much too much television and engage in far too many video games. It’s nice to do some enjoyable exercise and spend time outside. It requires a great deal of balance, is rather technical, and is an excellent way to meet new people.

You may be concerned about their safety, which is natural, but it is really pretty safe. Simply ensure they are wearing at least a helmet and keep a tight eye on them. You may try visiting a skate park after they’ve developed a bit more. Simply avoid taking over the park and adhere to skateboarder etiquette; show respect for the skaters and they will show you respect.

Arrive early in the morning when it is less busy to ensure that your child does not feel frightened. Invite some of the ladies and boys present to assist your child; many like offering advice and hints! Even if you’re not very into skateboarding, it’s enjoyable to see your child have a wonderful time.

 

Protective Gear for Kids

While I understand you’re seeking for a skateboard, I’m concerned that parents often neglect to get safety gear. At my neighborhood skate park, there are hundreds of scooter children, and 95% of them are without wearing any form of safety. I just can not see why their parents will not get a helmet and knee protectors for them.

It’s not costly; you don’t need heavy-duty safety gear, but be sure it fits properly and won’t slip off. Here is a link to my suggested protective gear sets for children, which includes, but is not limited to, a decent helmet. Spare no expense on helmets!

I’ve already given away many pairs of old elbow pads that I mistook for knee pads (they’re tiny enough to provide some knee protection). I’m sure their parents have no clue what they’re doing out there. Some of them are just fearless and do insane leaps without their parents’ knowledge.

This reminds me of me as a child. When I was approximately ten years old and discovered a track nearby, I used to ride a BMX. I just went for it and attempted to gather as much speed as possible in order to make a massive leap. It didn’t end well and I was seriously injured; I just couldn’t see the risk in what I was doing. Following that, I became more circumspect.

Purchase a helmet for your child, and I suggest a set that includes elbow- knee- and wrist protectors. If you want your child to wear the helmet, it should be comfy.

 

Summary

There is nothing further I can say other than to summarize this article. You do not need a child-size skateboard; a standard (8-inch-wide) skateboard will suffice, and avoid purchasing a mini-deck.

Ascertain that your kid is not too young; wait until they reach the age of roughly five. Avoid toy shops and, if feasible, purchase from a local skate shop or online.

Purchase a secondhand skateboard if you like, but keep a careful eye on the board’s condition. Assure that your children are always wearing appropriate safety gear and that you remain with them when they are still very little.

Purchase a whole skateboard to save the effort of sorting through all the components and become an expert in skateboard parts. Shoes should be skateboarding-appropriate and give stability.

 

 

How to build a skate box

During a pandemic, you can still skate, as I said last week. Keep your distance from everyone and just be alone. Today, we’ll show you how to make your own skate box.
If you take a look at your toolbox and go to the hardware store, you’ll be ready to build! Make sure you have everything you need and set up your space in a way that is comfortable for you.
Everything is ready. Let’s get to work now, people!

Make the frame.

A strong foundation is just as important for a skate box as it is for a building. The frame must be strong enough to hold up all of your moves without breaking. Align two full-length 2x4s on the ground. Cut another 2×4 into three equal parts. Afterward, Each end of the 2x4s should have two at each end and a third in the middle for support. Everything can be put together.
Add some small 2x4s to support your weight as you slide it. When you’re done with the frame, you’ll want to build the box’s top. When the long 2x4s are laid down and tied together at the ends, a rectangle is made. Add as many small 2x4s between the 2x4s you already have. In the end, we agreed to have a total of 5.

Connect both sides of the frame.

There are two parts of your frame now that you’ve built them. You will need to connect the top and bottom parts together. For the frame to be joined together, you need six 2x4s of different sizes. Screw your 2×4 pieces to the bottom of your box in all four corners and the middle. Top section: Screw it on top of two-by-fours.
It should be strong and stable when the support beams are in place and the construction is done right. I think it should be able to hold your weight. If the box doesn’t move when you jump on it, you can keep going.

Put the plywood on the ground and level it.

As soon as you finish building your skateboard box, it’s time to lay down the ice. Your plywood sheet should be on the ground, and the box’s skeleton should be on top of it, as shown in this picture. After you’ve drawn on the box’s top and front surfaces, cut two pieces of plywood. Then, with a saw, cut the plywood into the shape of the box.
Make sure the plywood covers the whole top of the box, but doesn’t go beyond the frame’s borders. It’s important to remove any extra. As a last thing, make sure that the front is covered as well. You should screw both sides together and make sure it’s stable before you add the Iron angle.

 Place the iron angel

The last, but not the least, step! When you slide or grind on the iron angle of the box, you will do it here. In this case, you need to set the angle so that it’s just above where the plywood pieces of your box come together. A layer of wax is all that is needed to make the box look nice and finish it. Get on the ice!