Author: Diana Hicks

How to do tech deck tricks?

This is a comprehensive compilation of practically every fingerboard trick available. One thing to keep in mind is that new tricks are always being added to the list, and theoretically, you may build new tricks by combining two or more of current techniques. You may have an endless amount of tricks; but, they become tricks only when they are performable. We’ve included just a handful combo tricks to save space and avoid listing hundreds of “potential” trick combinations. Save this page and return to this fingerboard trick list to choose the next trick to master. The following is a comprehensive list of fingerboarding tricks:

Aerial Manoeuvres

Ollie: The simplest trick, performed by popping the tail of your board with your rear finger.
Nollie: Similar to an ollie, except with your front finger pop the nose of your board down.
Fakie Ollie: A fakie nollie is just a switch nollie.
Fakie Nollie: A switch ollie.
180 Ollie: Ollie and half-rotate the board.
360 Ollie: Ollie and complete a full revolution of the board.
540 Ollie: Ollie and spin the board 1.5 times.
720 Ollie: Ollie and complete two full revolutions of the board.
900 Ollie: Ollie and spin the board twice.
Ollie and spin the board three complete revolutions 1080 Ollie: Ollie and spin the board three full rotations.
Nollie’s Nollie Spins: After a nollie, do a 180, 360, 540, 720, 900, or 1080 spin.
Ollie North and Ollie South: Ollie and twist your hand forward or backward to perpendicularly position your board.
Ollie Kickflip and Land as a Nose Manual: Ollie kickflip and land as a nose manual.
Nollie North and Nollie South: Nollie and twist your hand forward or backward to perpendicularly position your board.
Nollie kickflip and landing as a nose manual.
Nollie Flip: A backfoot kickflip combined with a nollie.
Wallie: Ollie off the wall after a wallride.
Shove-It: Ollie and scoop the board 180 degrees with your rear finger.
Pop Shove-It: A shove-it with the board rising higher, often over an obstacle.
360 Shove-It: A shove-it with an additional half-turn to complete the 360-degree rotation.
Shove-It Underflip: Ollie and do a 360 pop shove-it, then heelflip to the bottom of the board.
Rewind Shove-It: Ollie and pop shove-it, then tap the tail forward with your rear finger to spin the other direction.
Impossible: Ollie and backflip the board over your fingertips once.
Dustin Impossible: Ollie and use your rear finger to tap the nose of your board to do a front flip.
Double Impossible: Similar to a double backflip, but may need an additional push on the tail with your back finger.
To half impossible, perform a half kickflip and catch the board upside down on the tail with your pointer finger.
Hard Flip: A combination of a half backflip and a heelflip.
Awkward Flip Rewind: Similar to a hard flip, but combining a front flip with a heelflip.
This is a double hard flip, which consists of a complete backflip plus a double heelflip.
A Single Wheel Ollie: Ollie your board by rolling it on one of the rear wheels.
Kickflip: Ollie and use your front finger to grasp the nose of your board, rotating the board toward you in one spin.
Kickflip Double: Similar to a kickflip but with two spins.
Triple Kickflip: Three complete kickflip revolutions, requiring more pressure on the tail pop and front finger catch while maintaining control.
Varial Kickflip: A kickflip combined with a pop shove-it.
Late Flip: This move is similar to a kickflip, except that you complete the kickflip as the board approaches the ground.
Kickflip Underflip: Ollie high and kickflip up, then push the board in the other direction to heelflip down.
Thumb Flip: Perform a kickflip, but instead of touching the nose of the board with your front finger, flip it with your thumb.
Heelflip: Similar to a kickflip, but with the board rotating away from you rather than toward you.
Heelflip Variation: Begin with a shove-it and then flick out for a heelflip.
Perform a varial heelflip (shove-it into a heelflip), but rotate the board one full revolution (360 degrees) rather than half a rotation (180 degrees).
Pivot The Fingerboard: Pivot the fingerboard a half revolution, or 180 degrees, while repositioning your fingers.
360 Flip (Tre Flip): Perform a kickflip and a backflip in unison.
Cabbalerial (Full Cab): While riding fakie, do a 360 degree spin in the air.
Half Cab: While riding fakie, do a 180 in the air.
Ollie high and smack the tail of your board while in the air, allowing the board to roll over your knuckles and then off your fingers for landing.
Superman: Ollie high, leaving your middle finger on the board, and sticking your pointer and ringing finger in the air as you fall.
Flap Jack: As with a knuckler, you strike the tail and let the board to roll into your knuckles. Rather of rolling forward off your fingers, though, turn the board toward your thumb or pinky for a half flip or backflip.

Conclusion

Begin with the basics and work your way up until you’ve mastered them all. Take your time learning each trick, and after you’ve mastered a few of them, you may experiment with adding more rotations and spins, as well as riding switch or fakie.
Make a note of this ultimate fingerboard trick list so you may go to it whenever you’re looking for new tricks to master.

How To Do Skateboard Tricks

In the past, if you’ve looked up “beginner skateboard tricks,” you know how much garbage is out there. When someone says a turn or stop is “beginner trick,” it’s a lot easier to believe them than it is to believe them.

If you don’t want to read any more, here are 10 simple skateboard tricks that you can do without any help at all. Enjoy your time and skate!

1: The Chinese Nollie

“All you have to do is give the board a little push forward to bounce the front wheel off a crack,” says VLSkate. This will make the board rise off the ground. If you know how to hop on the nose of your board, you can pull off this trick. Make sure you don’t hit the nose of the board on the ground, says VLSkate. You’re just lifting the back wheels up, and everything else is just on top.

2. Biebelheimer

Next, we have the biebelheimer. Getting on your board isn’t so much a trick as a fun way to get there. VLSkate says this: “You only need to grab the board with your nose and your fingers on the other side. So, turn the board 180 degrees so the grip tape would hit the ground. The most important thing is to make sure it’s slightly angled when you throw it down, so that it doesn’t hit the ground straight on. That makes the flip over happen.”

Is there a way to do this? Stand still and try to flip the board. This trick also doesn’t work if you scrape the tail on the ground.

3. Shove It.

For the Shove It, “Putting your foot on the nose doesn’t even need to be done. You don’t even need to pop it. All you need to do is move your feet a little bit and hop a little bit. You don’t need anything else.” The gif makes it clear.

4. Boneless

People also say that the boneless isn’t as good at popping their boards, but more about jumping off their feet instead. Putting your feet in a way that allows your front foot to easily come off the side and land on the ground is all it takes. Jump off your back foot with the hand, then jump back on the board.

5. Fakie Frontside 180

No, I can’t. Pop your board! You do the rest of the work with the fakie frontside 180. VL Skate tells you the secrets “There is no need to do anything else. In case you’re having trouble with the regular front-side 180, this one would be a better choice for you.”

Wait! You might not know that Board Blazers are the only LED lights that work with tricks.

6. Hippie Jump

VLSkate says that the hippie jump is very easy to do because all you need to know how to do is to jump. “In general, the most important thing is that you don’t land on your tail or nose when you jump. Stand above the bolts at all times.”

how to do this one? “Jump around a lot and try to do it a lot. If you’re afraid, start small and work your way up.”

7. Rail Stand

Putting your feet in a way that your front foot will push down the side of the rail stand will make it flip over. A four-step process:

Give it enough pressure until it starts to flip over, then let go of it.

As the board turns, your back foot hangs on the back wheel, and you step over and on top of it.

In the end, you move your front foot back, so that now you’re able to stand on your rail.

A little push forward, and you’re back on top of the board.

The best way to learn is to do it. The best way to learn this trick is to do it while holding on to something, VLSkate says. It only takes a few times to get the hang of it, though.

8. Fakie Casper Flop

To do this trick, you first stand on the tail of your board with your back foot on the tail, and then you flip the board over by putting your back foot on the tail again. “Putting on skates is easier than it looks, says VLSkate. “All you need to do is stand still a few times and practice.” Turn the board over by pressing down and to the side, then flip it back over with both your feet. Then put them together and you’ve got it.” He says, “It’s kind of silly, but I like it.”

9. 180 Can’t be done.

It doesn’t work for the 180. “You want your front foot to be in a place where it can easily step off the board, and your back foot should be slightly on the tail so that you can get some spin out of it. You just have to press down and scoop the tail.”

How can I do the best job? It’s possible to practice both standing still and scooping with your back foot at the same time. Then, you can put them together and make sure you jump back on the board.

10. Using your nose to pick up the scent

If you can pick up your board the normal way and even the fancy way where you kick it up with your foot, this is the opposite of that, says VLSkate. It can be done a lot faster if you’re going fast. “It also looks good. When you’re rolling, you put your front foot on the nose of the board. You then pop your toes straight down and reach down to grab the board.”

Is there a way to do this? “Popping the nose down is the only thing you need to do to improve. That will make the board fly up. You just want to make sure you aren’t putting your weight down on the nose of the board.”

VLSkate thinks these tricks are bad “I think that it’s important to stay motivated because you feel like you’re getting better. Progress is progress, and even simple tricks can help you become a better skater.”

Let us know which trick you like best. My favorite kind of jump is the Hippie Jump, but Greg likes the Boneless one.

What if you want to light up your board at the skatepark? Board Blazers are skateboard lights that help you stay safe when you do tricks with your lights on. A professional skater named Tech Na$ty helped us test it out. He put the skates through their paces and let us know how well they worked.

What is a Toaster? Everything you need to know.

Everything you need to know about Toaster

We are always on the lookout for little devices that can replace our present equipment while also freeing up counter space in the kitchen. One of the reasons a toaster is one of the most often used kitchen equipment in American homes is because of this. They are environmentally mindful as well as space savers.

Having said that, the process of selecting the greatest toaster is usually time-consuming and frustrating. And the primary reason for this is because the market is flooded various toaster models, each claiming to be the best of the best in their respective categories. Even worse, most consumers rush into the marketplace without even a rudimentary comprehension of what a toaster is or how it operates.

How can you choose the finest of anything if you do not understand how it functions or the characteristics that distinguish it from the rest?

That is why I chose to write this essay, in which I explain what a toaster is and provide you with all of the fundamental information you will need to be successful in your search for the finest toaster available on the market.

Before anything further, let us take a quick look at the following:

What exactly is a toaster?

Toasters are basic and user-friendly kitchen appliances that are used to softly cook and toast bread slices, resulting in crispier, darker, and more delicious bread slices. Whenever you use one of these gadgets, you’ll need to turn the knob on the tool to choose how dark you want your bread slices to be toasted.

Following that, you will insert your bread slices into the toasting slots on the front of your appliance and then push the lever on the front of your appliance to begin the toasting process. Using a toaster is simple, as we shall see in the next section, which includes detailed instructions.

Always keep your nostrils open while using a toaster, though, to ensure that it is not burning your mouth or throat. Using a toaster is a simple task.

There are many various varieties of toasters available, each with its own set of characteristics that distinguishes it from the others in terms of how it is used. Having stated that, the next portion of the text will cover the typical methods that one will go through while utilizing a normal toaster oven.

1. Set a piece of bread into each slot on the toaster.

If you have a toaster with many slots, you may toast only one slice of bread at a time, in which case you will only need to choose one slot and place your bread slice in it. If you are dealing with a single slot toaster that has a lengthy slot, it is likely that it can accommodate two pieces of bread.

Furthermore, while the direction in which you opt to put your slices into the appliance is not important, the most natural method to do so is to start at the bottom of the slice.

2. Select the appropriate degree of toasting.

Following the completion of step number one, it is time to set the toaster. Make use of the adjustment knob located on the front side of your toaster to choose how dark you want your toast to be. Toasters often have various toasting settings, with the first setting being lightest and the highest setting being the darkest; the lightest setting is number one on most toasters.

If this is your first time using a toaster, I strongly advise you to choose between the second and third settings. Thus, the middle layer of your bread slices will be toasted halfway through. If you find that the blackness does not interest you, you may toast it once more.

You will see that other toasters have a variety of options as well, including bagels, toast, and waffles, among others. In such circumstances, just choose the settings that are most appropriate for the meal that you are making.

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3. To begin the toasting process, press the lever all the way down.

Allow for ample toasting time for the slices. It is also critical that you keep your nostrils open during this operation in order to detect any burning. Depending on how dark you want your toast to be, the toasting technique should take no more than a minute or two to complete.

Despite the fact that most toaster ovens are timed and will automatically pop the bread slices up, I strongly advise you to never leave your toaster oven unattended at any time. In this manner, if the bread slices begin to burn, you will be able to swiftly remove them from the oven by hand.

In the event that you need to manually pop the bread slice out of your toaster, just hold the top side corner of your toaster down while lifting the lever up. Please note that I only recommend doing this if you detect that the bread pieces are beginning to burn.

4. Remove the food from the room.

You have completed your toasting of your dinner. This shows that the toasting operation has come to an end as the lever automatically raises. Take the toasts out of the oven using your hand. You may also use wood tongs, but since the bread slices are neatly risen, you won’t have to worry about your fingers being burned while you’re cooking.

Keep in mind that you should not use anything metal to recover the toasts for your own safety. You run the risk of electrocuting yourself.

The development of the toaster

Electric toasters have only been on the market for a little more than a decade. Consumption of bread, on the other hand, has been a well-known tradition for almost 6,000 years, and people have been toasting their bread since the time of the Romans.

For centuries before the advent of the electric toaster, people toasted bread over open flames using a diverse assortment of basic kitchen implements and utensils. Toasting bread back then, as it is now, was more than simply a method of preserving it from spoilage.

It transformed the bread’s texture and flavor, making it crunchier and sweeter, and the top became a terrific surface for spreading all kinds of stuff.

Please find here to get new information!

How to Customize Your Skateboard

Tips For Creating Unique Skateboards
Nothing like pulling up to the park and getting compliments on your skateboard. “Cool Skateboard!” they say. “I’ve never seen that graphic!” makes one feel pretty unique. It’s much better when you can say “Thanks, I made it!”
You may create your own personalized skateboard in various ways. You may order a bespoke skateboard with a personalized graphic for a particular reason. You’ll get a tidy, professional outcome. Customizing your skateboard is easy. Let’s examine several creative outlets.

Skateboards Can Be Customized

ABSOLUTELY!!! Your skateboard should reflect your individuality and style, so feel free to modify it as you like. Every aspect of your skateboard may be modified to your liking. However, the cost of customizing a skateboard varies substantially.

You may modify your skateboard by:
Create your own original graphic on a skateboard!!! You may design your own skateboard, paint it, silk screen it, or simply doodle on it using markers. Customize your skateboard with these choices.
• Custom Griptape: You may quickly design your grip tape to appear unique. Color it using paint pens, combine various griptapes, or tear it up to make unique patterns. Griptape modification is almost unlimited.
• Design a Skateboard from Scratch: This will address practical rather than graphic design. Custom skateboards may be built to fit any style. Preferably with griptape and hardware. Put it all together and you have an entirely unique skateboard.

Let’s go further into these customizing possibilities.
Customized Skateboards
Custom skateboard printing doesn’t have to be pricey or need a minimum run of 50. “Custom Skateboard Complete” from CCS.com. This option enables you to customize your skateboard’s bottom graphic and components for only $109.95 USD.
The CCS brand components are included, but you may improve the trucks, wheels, bearings, hardware, and griptape for a little more. For a completely personalized and professional skateboard, CCS.com is by far the greatest value. They will even assemble it for you for free!

The CCS.com UI is very user-friendly. You input text, pick color and font, then position it. You may also add photos from your PC to the deck. It’s a fun little design tool. Suddenly, hours have passed.
I inserted 3 text boxes with various fonts and colors where I needed them. I added an old photo of my pets in the center. It’s a simple example, but it highlights the simplicity of deck design.
Sizes vary from 7.75′′ to 8.5′′. The typical popsicle form is crafted from Canadian Hard Rock Maple. CCS.com will provide a high-quality comprehensive.

Deck Painting

Paint your skateboard to make it unique. There are many ways to color your skateboard. You just need sandpaper, paint, and imagination.
• Remove the trucks and hardware. Working around these obstacles will be difficult, and you don’t want paint on any moving components.
• Sand the board to help the paint cling. This will remove any factory varnish or sealant. The image doesn’t have to be completely erased, just sanded. Just be careful not to sand through any layers of plywood. Before continuing, wipe the surface free of any sawdust or dirt.
Starting with a white primer gives you a clean and even canvas for your new design. It also prepares the skateboard for painting. Two applications of priming should enough.
• Clean the surface before painting. Here’s where you get creative. Paint your skateboard using acrylic or spray paint. You may utilize a variety of methods to reach your goal. You may use masking tape, stencils, or just paint freehand. Bring forth your inner Pablo Picasso or keep things basic. Your option… You create.

Griptape

Many individuals like cutting griptape into unique shapes. Some prefer to go fancy and build cobblestone or brick designs. Others will put triangles or diamonds on. For fun designs, combine colors of griptape or add transparent griptape.

There’s no end to the patterns you can carve into griptape (provided it still gives you grip on your board). Griptape is easy to cut. It is recommended to cut griptape from the underside (paper side).
Place it on a fragile surface like plywood or a cutting mat. Use a new utility knife blade. Peel off the paper and attach the cut grip tape in place. Don’t cut. They can’t take the punishment and will soon dim.

What Do I Need?

Because I was constructing a fresh setup, I chose components I’d been wanting to check out. The Skateboard Configurator helped me choose the components for my Cruiser. The components I utilized in this configuration are as follows:

Dead Guys Stinger 9.125 x 32.5 Skull Skates It’s a big, stable deck. The graphics on Skull Skates Decks have always appealed to me, and I wanted an old school shape, so I decided to give it a shot.
To fit a deck of that size, I required a truck that was broad. I like how Indy carves so I chose with the Hollow Forged to lighten it up.
ATF Rough Rider 59mm Wheels – I generally like little wheels, but not on a cruiser. The smallest I could think of was 59mm. In tough terrain, the Bones ATF is claimed to be smooth and gentle. I figured this was the best arrangement.
My previous choice of bearing was Bones Big Ball Reds. They are the default bearing. I wanted to try Big Ball Reds since they are touted to be similar to Bones Swiss.
Although I skate with loose trucks and suffer from severe wheel bite, I never use risers. Despite acquiring Independent Trucks, I knew I’d need risers (which are higher than most brands). Because I was receiving Indy Trucks, I went with Indy Risers.
I like Allen Bolts, but they didn’t have them in this length. Any brand would have worked, but Shorty’s was reasonably priced and well-reviewed.
It’s just a plain old black Mob grip tape. I buy Mob. It outperforms others I’ve tried. I know how it acts and enters. Its my favorite grip.
• Rails: Pig Rails (Pink) – I’ve never liked rails, but I needed them to board slide curbs with this arrangement. But they only had pink and I’m not picky.

However, I now have a new setup that I adore for riding rough streets and slamming into curbs. It’s great for carving bowls. (I may ride bowls more now.)

Create Your Own Skateboard!

That’s it! Customizing a skateboard is a straightforward and enjoyable procedure. It is fantastic to make something truly unique. There are several ways to make your dream skateboard a reality.

How to coleman slide?

If you want to learn how to slide on a longboard, this is the place to start. This is how you start. The Coleman Slide is a move that comes from early surf-style bank skating when it’s used on a hill. If you want to be able to stop quickly and look good doing it, you need to have this move in your toolbox. Whether you are a carver, speedboarder, or slider, you should spend some time getting this on. It doesn’t matter if the wheels are soft or hard, and it works with any length of board. There’s no reason why you can’t do this with some practice. Having slide gloves will make sure you can get over any hill that comes your way.

Jorge Pernes, a member of the Lush team, is showing off here. He has goofy feet, which means that he skates with his right foot forward. The way Jorge does it is that he skates with his left foot forward. If you skate that way, you’ll plant your left hand and slide to the left. Take a look at how your front hand still goes down on the road. Then, your back arm starts the game.

It’s important to note that a lot of people learn how to slide by grabbing the rail. This looks easier and safer at first, but it actually makes it more difficult to start and stop the slide. This makes it more difficult to slide down and back up again. Even when you are already in the slide, you can’t use your free arm to steer with. Putting on leathers and a full-face helmet and going very fast will keep the board under you. If you’re just starting to throw your first coleman slides, we strongly recommend that you learn it the right way – without the grab! You’ll be less likely to get taken advantage of, you’ll have more control, and… it looks better, too! You can thank us when you do.

Cliff Coleman, a friend of ours, came up with this one. In his sixties, he’s still skating down the hill.

Get Ready

Speed up as you approach the slide. If you’re going faster than you feel comfortable, that might be about right. Keep your weight in the middle, bend your knees, and keep your posture relaxed.

Setup

Get ready to slide by making a small turn across the road.

Get Low Sit down

on your board. You should bend your knees and roll your back foot, but don’t back away from the slide. Keep your weight forward, over your front truck. If you go down the slide with confidence, you’ll be fine. When you get scared and back away from it, things can get weird.

Initiate

Place your front hand on the road, out in front of and to the side of your wheels, on the ground. It’s important to keep moving forward. Leaning back is a very common mistake for new skaters at this point. This causes the back wheels on your back to grip up so you get thrown off.

Let it Go.

When you start the slide, put some weight on your hand. Swing your free arm across your body to start. People who take Cliff Coleman’s slide class are told to hit an imaginary parrot that is sitting on their front shoulder. When you swing that arm, the more the board will turn. It will also be easier to get it to face the right way again. Keep your eyes on where you’re going, not where the board is aimed.

For as long as you want to, hold the slide out. If you do this correctly, your upper body will be facing sideways or backwards, and you’ll be looking over your back shoulder down the road. To slow down faster, hold the board sideways, and to style it out, go all the way around until you’re backwards! This is how to do it!

Bring it back.

In order to turn the board around, bring your free arm back down next to you. In this step, you’ll undo the twist that you made in your body in the previous step, and your legs and board will follow.

Next Step.

Go around the corner! Rather than putting your foot on the brakes and sliding into a corner “predrift,” try moving your speedboard in the opposite direction to slow down and keep the speed down.

Take some time to learn the toe side/back side equivalent, which is more intimidating but can give you more control and brake power. If that’s not enough, then you’ll also be able to set up for corners in both directions.

Some other fun ways to do this are to do it one-footed, or without putting your hand on the road. You can even turn around backwards with a coleman, but this takes a lot of speed and a very sharp corner.

How to clean skateboard wheels?

cleaning skateboard wheels

A skateboard isn’t a vehicle that can go on every surface. We glide through some oddities. It’s all in good humor. You may bash down crusty slopes in downtown and ride your favorite dirty skatepark. Finally, you’ll notice your wheels need a thorough cleaning. They didn’t pick up their dog. Because skateboards are susceptible to water and are exposed to street filth and grime, cleaning your wheels is more difficult than you think.

Our wheels have seen it all. Anything the city streets and dusty skatepark can provide. It keeps us on our boards. So we should adore them. They are near permeable surfaces. In the absence of a dishwasher, we intend to wash our wheels using soap. We’ll need to focus on the details and work hard.

We don’t want to do things that get our wheels filthy, as skaters know. Begin with a bucket of water or a sink. Second, be prepared to get soaked if you do it well. In six easy steps, any skater can clean their wheels. We’ve covered the basics and even how to maintain your wheels.

 

To begin, you’ll need:

  • A squeaky (table, floor, or counter)
  • A sink or a bucket
  • Soap and a towel to clean the area (optional)
  • There should also be a compartment for the wheels (optional)
  • Paper towels (always a good idea)

Wheels Cleaning

Cleaning your wheels makes a lot of sense. Some things are unclear. You’ll often start riding your board and then find something is wrong. Gum or soft, greasy wheels that can’t grip the skatepark cement may cause your bike to wobble and crash. Why does it matter? Your trip will be rough if they aren’t cleaned. You like the new wheels. Skateboarders have used these tried-and-true methods to maintain their wheels clean before taking them to a shop.

Dirt and wax may be removed by dragging skateboard wheels diagonally and crisscrossing across brick.

Skating gets your wheels heated, which helps them shed grit. Make sure the slope isn’t too steep. Observe!

Keep clean clothes: A puddle. Sandbox Jump off your board to save your wheels.

  • Check for any flat patches. If so, you’ll nearly always require new wheels to prevent a jarring ride.
  • Wheels! Like automobiles, your board might benefit from a redesign.

You’re ready to learn how to clean your skateboard wheels now that you’ve got the tools.

Step 1: Ensure Workplace Safety

Cleaning anything makes you filthy. This is particularly true for skateboards, which are mostly used on filthy cement. Make sure your workstation is organized. Most people imagine a level area with plenty of space to maneuver. Disconnect the wheels and bearings. You’ll need a safe location to store them. It also has a sink or a bucket of water, as listed above. Overall, you and the rest of the globe will be soaked. Use a towel to keep the area clean, or work outdoors or over the sink. Remember that we don’t want your board’s wooden deck or bearings wet. It all boils down to preparation.

Step 2.1: Remove the Wheels and Bearings.

This is the technical component of cleaning your wheels. Prepare your skateboard and equipment for wheel removal, then start removing them one by one. Remove all axle bolts. After removing a wheel’s bolt, insert your truck’s axle at a 45-degree angle into the bearing’s mouth. This will build a crowbar-like tool for removing the bearings. Each wheel has two bearings. Keep them protected. You should also clean your bearings now (highly recommended). To clean your four wheels, remove each wheel and bearing. Keep your bearings dry at all times.

Step 2.2: Clean your bearings.

It’s okay if you don’t like the 2B’s stealthy move. We let you clean your bearings here since you’ll need to remove them to clean your wheels. Putting your bearings in a cup of isopropyl alcohol while cleaning your wheels is a smart idea. A tiny adjustment may have a tremendous impact on how the wheels perform. This will help you move quicker and smoother. Check out our fast and simple how-to instruction on how to clean skateboard bearings! Both work.

Step 3: Wash Your Wheels.

A bucket or a sink would be useful for housework. You may be able to run them without one. Be prepared for a mess. Using Dawn dishwashing soap in a bucket or blocked sink might assist you clean your wheels and remove the bearings. This way, you can work faster. Remove the bearings from the wheels so the soap can start breaking away the muck. Despite our expectations, there was a lot of mud and debris in the wheel track. The dirtiest stuff is inside the wheels. After a bath, dry them with a cloth or paper towel. Inside, we’re ready to tackle the wheel track and sides. It’s critical that your skateboard wheels soak up enough water to readily scrape off the dirt. Then comes the most critical phase.

Step 4: Wire Brush the Gunk Off.

A wire brush isn’t easy to come by. Wire brushes are widely available at hardware and bargain shops. We’ve also linked to an Amazon.com wire brush. If you want to go all out, use an old toothbrush or grip tape. This vital step is as simple as it seems. After rinsing your wheels with hot water, use the brush to scrape off any debris. Let your wheels soak for a bit to get rid of the grime. You may need to keep applying Dawn dish soap to particular locations, but once your wheels are clean, you must wash away any soapy residue. Only soap won’t leave chemicals or make your wheels sticky. Once your wheels are clean, it’s time for step 5.

Step 5: Dry your skateboard’s wheels.

It’s critical to let your wheels dry after cleaning them. Wheels are porous, so when wet, they not only take up more dirt, but also make your ride less smooth. Also, make sure your wheels are absolutely dry before putting in your bearings and connecting them to the board (step 6). Your bearings will corrode, and water will make your deck slippery. This is why we created this How-To tutorial. Why did we do it? Unskilled skaters might ruin their boards by trying to clean their wheels. Make sure your wheels are completely dry before letting them sit in the sun. Use a cloth or paper towels. Putting on the wheels prematurely makes them heavier and slower.

Step 6: Reassemble your wheels and board.

Congratulations! Your skateboard wheels are almost clean. And we’re still there. Reassembling your board allows you to alter your wheels’ direction. Front wheels of skaters who choose fakie or switch stance may slant or curve. They skate a lot. If your wheels are really old and worn, you may have to leave them that way to maintain them straight. But rotating wheels may extend their life and improve performance. See our bearings instructions if you’re ready to reinstall your clean bearings. Reassemble your board as in Step 2. Once your skateboard is set up, inspect the wheels. You deserve a break after all your efforts. Make a day of it and go to your favorite skatepark or downhill run!

How to clean skateboard trucks?

A skateboard isn’t a vehicle that can go on every surface. We glide through some oddities. It’s all in good humor. You may bash down crusty slopes in downtown and ride your favorite dirty skatepark. Finally, you’ll notice your wheels need a thorough cleaning. They didn’t pick up their dog. Because skateboards are susceptible to water and are exposed to street filth and grime, cleaning your wheels is more difficult than you think.
Our wheels have seen it all. Anything the city streets and dusty skatepark can provide. It keeps us on our boards. So we should adore them. They are near permeable surfaces. In the absence of a dishwasher, we intend to wash our wheels using soap. We’ll need to focus on the details and work hard.
We don’t want to do things that get our wheels filthy, as skaters know. Begin with a bucket of water or a sink. Second, be prepared to get wet if you do it right. In six easy steps, any skater can clean their wheels. We’ve covered the basics and even how to maintain your wheels.
Let’s party!

To begin, you’ll need:

• A squeaky (table, floor, or counter)
a sink or a bucket
Soap and a cloth to clean the area (optional)
There should also be a compartment for the wheels (optional)
• Paper towels (always a good idea)

When You Clean Your Wheels

Cleaning your wheels makes a lot of sense. Some things are unclear. You’ll often start riding your board and then find something is wrong. Gum or soft, greasy wheels that can’t grip the skatepark cement may cause your bike to wobble and crash. Why does it matter? Your trip will be rough if they aren’t cleaned. You like the new wheels. Skateboarders have used these tried-and-true methods to maintain their wheels clean before taking them to a shop.
Dirt and wax may be removed by dragging skateboard wheels diagonally and crisscrossing across brick.
Skating gets your wheels heated, which helps them shed grit. Make sure the slope isn’t too steep. Observe!
Keep clean clothes: A puddle. Sandbox Jump off your board to save your wheels.
• Check for any flat patches. If so, you’ll nearly always require new wheels to prevent a jarring ride.
• Wheels! Like automobiles, your board might benefit from a redesign.
You’re ready to learn how to clean your skateboard wheels now that you’ve got the tools.

Step 1: Ensure Workplace Safety
Cleaning anything makes you filthy. This is particularly true for skateboards, which are mostly used on filthy cement. Make sure your workstation is organized. Most people imagine a level area with plenty of space to maneuver. Disconnect the wheels and bearings. You’ll need a safe location to store them. It also has a sink or a bucket of water, as listed above. Overall, you and the rest of the globe will be soaked. Use a towel to keep the area clean, or work outdoors or over the sink. Remember that we don’t want your board’s wooden deck or bearings wet. It all boils down to preparation.

Step 2.1: Remove the Wheels and Bearings.
This is the technical component of cleaning your wheels. Prepare your skateboard and equipment for wheel removal, then start removing them one by one. Remove all axle bolts. After removing a wheel’s bolt, insert your truck’s axle at a 45-degree angle into the bearing’s mouth. This will build a crowbar-like tool for removing the bearings. Each wheel has two bearings. Keep them protected. You should also clean your bearings now (highly recommended). To clean your four wheels, remove each wheel and bearing. Keep your bearings dry at all times.

Step 2.2: Clean your bearings  
It’s okay if you don’t like the 2B’s stealthy move. We let you clean your bearings here since you’ll need to remove them to clean your wheels. Putting your bearings in a cup of isopropyl alcohol while cleaning your wheels is a smart idea. A tiny adjustment may have a tremendous impact on how the wheels perform. This will help you move quicker and smoother. Check out our fast and simple how-to instruction on how to clean skateboard bearings! Both work.

Step 3: Soak Your Wheels.
A bucket or a sink would be useful for housework. You may be able to run them without one. Be prepared for a mess. Using Dawn dishwashing soap in a bucket or blocked sink might assist you clean your wheels and remove the bearings. This way, you can work faster. Remove the bearings from the wheels so the soap can start breaking away the muck. Despite our expectations, there was a lot of mud and debris in the wheel track. The dirtiest stuff is inside the wheels. After a bath, dry them with a cloth or paper towel. Inside, we’re ready to tackle the wheel track and sides. It’s critical that your skateboard wheels soak up enough water to readily scrape off the dirt. Then comes the most critical phase.

Step 4 :Brush the Gunk Off.
A wire brush isn’t easy to get by. Wire brushes are widely available at hardware and bargain shops. We’ve also linked to an Amazon.com wire brush. If you want to go all out, try an old toothbrush or grip tape. This vital step is as simple as it seems. After rinsing your wheels with hot water, use the brush to scrape out any debris. Let your wheels soak for a bit to get rid of the grime. You may need to keep applying Dawn dish soap to particular locations, but once your wheels are clean, you must wash away any soapy residue. Only soap won’t leave chemicals or make your wheels sticky.

Step 5: Dry your skateboard’s wheels.
It’s critical to let your wheels dry after cleaning them. Wheels are porous, so when wet, they not only take up more dirt, but also make your ride less smooth. Also, make sure your wheels are absolutely dry before putting in your bearings and connecting them to the board (step 6). Your bearings will corrode, and water will make your deck slippery. This is why we created this How-To tutorial. Why did we do it? Unskilled skaters might ruin their boards by trying to clean their wheels. Make sure your wheels are completely dry before letting them sit in the sun. Use a cloth or paper towels. Putting on the wheels prematurely makes them heavier and slower.

Step 6: Reassemble your wheels and board.
Congratulations! Your skateboard wheels are almost clean. And we’re still there. Reassembling your board allows you to alter your wheels’ direction. Front wheels of skaters who choose fakie or switch stance may slant or curve. They skate a lot. If your wheels are really old and worn, you may have to leave them that way to maintain them straight. But rotating wheels may extend their life and improve performance. See our bearings instructions if you’re ready to reinstall your clean bearings. Reassemble your board as before.  Once your skateboard is set up, inspect the wheels. You deserve a break after all your efforts. Make a day of it and go to your favorite skatepark or downhill run!

How To Clean Skateboard Bearings?

how to clean skateboard bearings

Over time, dust and grit can collect in your skateboard’s bearings and hurt your ability to shred some sick moves. Regular maintenance is important if you want your skate bearings to last. Minor difficulties may be resolved by pouring a few drops of lubrication over the outer surface of each bearing and spinning them. Luckily, the process is easy enough to do at home.

 Tips: 

  • People sometimes think that they need to clean their skateboard wheels, but they only need to clean their bearings.
  • If your skateboard bearings have metal shields, you won’t be able to clean inside them, but it’s still a good idea. Step by step, you can easily bring them back to life if they have rubber or no shields.
  1. Gather the materials you need.

This job needs to be done quickly so that you can get back on your board as soon as possible. To do this, you need the right tools at hand. Things You’ll Need is where you’ll find the things you need. You’ll also need a bearing pole.

  • Skate tool
  • Tray to storage hardware
  • Sharpener or safety pin
  • Rag or toothbrush
  • Solvent
  • Container or bowl for solvent
  • Bearing lubricant
  1. Take the skateboard’s wheels off of it, then put it back together.

A socket wrench, ratchet, or skate tool can be used to loosen the nuts that hold the wheels in place. Your board may need to be steady and you may need to apply a lot of pressure to get the bolts to come off.

  1. Remove the parts and store them in a safe place.

Working on your board can make it easy to lose or misplace a nut, washer, or other parts. To avoid this, you might want to put the parts you don’t need to work in a plastic bag.

It is important to have a bolt and one to two bearing washers for each wheel that is taken off.

  1. Take the bearings off of the wheels and put them in a new place.

The bearing will be in the middle of the wheel, and it will be round. Remove the wheels, and then use a screwdriver to gently pry out the bearings. You can also use needle-nose pliers to carefully remove the bearings, but be careful.

To put the wheel on the truck, put it on like you’re attaching it. Make sure only one bearing (out of the two for that wheel) goes on the truck, though. Then, with the help of the truck, push the bearing out.

  • Some boards have an extra spacer between the bearings called a speed ring, and it helps them go faster. After you free the first bearing, you should take this one off.
  • To remove a bearing, you can use something called a “bearing puller.” If you don’t have one, you can use a thick metal rod (thin enough to fit through where an axle usually goes through) and gently hit it with a hammer. However, this could damage the bearings, so you need to be very careful about what you do.

Clean the Bearings

1.Get rid of the big dirt and grime.

You should be careful when you do this. You do not want to grind dirt into the bearings. Clean the bearings with a dry rag or paper towel to get rid of all the visible dirt.

To help cut through the grime, put some solvent on a rag or paper towel, and rub it in.

  1. Make a solution to clean your body.

When you have a clean bucket or bowl, fill it up with acetone or a grease-cleaning solvent. Mineral spirits or rubbing alcohol do a good job, aren’t as harsh as some cleaners, and aren’t as expensive as some other cleaners. • If you decide to use acetone, make sure you wear gloves because this solvent is very strong. Keep in mind that not all of your roommates want you to use acetone. You may want to use a more gentle solvent instead of acetone. Wear gloves when you work with acetone!

It may take a little longer for the bearings to be clean if you use a milder solvent, like mineral spirits.

3. Bearing shield caps can be popped off at this point.

Use a pin, a paperclip, or the point of a knife to get the rubber shield off of the bearing. These caps usually come in black or red, but they can also be white or blue. You should be able to see small metal balls after you remove the cap. If you have trouble, try inserting the pointed object between the rubber cap and bearing housing, then gently pry until the cap comes free.

 

4. Soak the bearings in the solvent, and then put them back in.

Now the bearings are ready to be put in the cleaning solution. Five minutes: Swirl and then let them sit in the solvent for about ten minutes, then rinse them off with clean water.

  • If the grease solvent has darkened a lot, you might need to carefully drain the solvent and add some more to the bucket. Once they look clean, do this a few more times.

It’s time to get rid of the bearings and let them dry.

Before you remove the bearings, make sure there is a level, safe place where they can dry. A paper towel or rag should be placed on the ground. Remove the bearings, and let them dry for a long time.

Greasing and Putting the Bearings back together

1.Speed up the drying process.

To dry the bearings, let them soak in water for about 10 minutes Canned air can help speed this up. It’s time to spray some canned air into the bearing’s open side. In this case, if it doesn’t move, spin the bearing with your finger and then spray the air while the bearing is already spinning.

2.Spread the lubricant.

It is best to use lubricant that is made for skateboard bearings. You should only need two or three drops of lubricant in each of the two or three bearings. After applying the lubricant, spin the bearing to make sure the lubricant gets into every part of it.

  • Don’t use: cooking oil, motor oil, or anything else that could make the bearings get dirty or make them stick. It also doesn’t work well. WD-40 lasts for only a short time, and it can dry out the bearings and make the lubricant not work.
  • Instead, use a Teflon-based lubricant instead of one that is silicone-based.
  1. Change the bearing shields.

Keep an eye on the seal between the bearing shield and bearing. The shields should pop into place without too much trouble. Make sure there are no gaps.

  1. Put the bearings back in.

As far as you can, push each bearing firmly into the wheel with your finger so that it goes into the wheel as far as you can. When you push the wheel down on a skateboard truck as hard as you can, the bearings will come home to the wheel.

  • If your board came with a bearing spacer (speed ring), don’t forget to put this between the bearings in the same way you found it.

5.Fit the wheels back on.

Now that the bearings are in the wheels as far as they can be, put the wheels back on the trucks. This is how it works: One washer should go on each side of the wheel. It’s also important that the wheels move a little when they’re reattached, but not too much.

6. If the wheels don’t fit right, make sure they aren’t loose.

Tightening a nut too much can make it hard for the wheel to move. Hand-test each wheel. Spin each one to make sure it moves freely.

A wheel may not spin or be hard to spin if you loosen the bolt that holds the wheel on to the truck.

 

How to clean roller skates ?

After all the fun you have with your skates, they’ll get dirty. As it turns out, cleaning skates isn’t that hard. If you skate roller skates or ice skates, you shouldn’t have any trouble giving your skates a new look. This is true for both. All you need to get the job done is a few simple cleaning supplies and tools that are easy to find. Even if you don’t skate very often, you should still clean your skates on a regular basis. This way, your skates stay in the best shape possible.

  1. Wash removable liners in a washing machine and air dry them. Take out any removable liners from inside your roller skates or inline skates and put them in your washing machine. This will help them get clean. A gentle laundry detergent should be added to the warm water cycle in your washing machine. You can set the temperature to up to 30°C (86°F). To do this: Run the cycle, then hang up the liners to dry in the sun.
  • Make sure you don’t use any detergents or fabric softeners that could damage your liners.
  • Take care to keep your liner out of the way of heat sources while it dries.
  1. If your skates get wet, use a clean cloth to dry them off. Take your skates off after you’ve used them and put them on some newspaper to help them dry if they get wet from your sweat or from riding in wet weather. The outside of your skates must be completely dried off to be safe.
  • One way to get dirt and dust out of your skates’ crevices is to use a clean, dry brush.
  1. Use a wrench or hex key to remove the wheels from your skates. A nut or bolt with a hex slot in the head might hold your wheels to the axle. You can see this by looking at the hubs. Use a wrench to get nuts off, and a hex key to get bolts with hex slots in their heads off. Wheels off:
  • Roller skates usually use nuts to keep the wheels on the axles. Inline skates, like rollerblades, usually use bolts with hex slots in their heads to keep the wheels on the axles. To remove roller skate wheels, you need a wrench. To remove inline skate wheels, you need a hex key.
  • An Allen wrench or Allen key is also called a “hex key.”
  • Use a skate tool that has different wrench sockets and heads to remove skate wheels, as well.
  • You should clean your wheels and bearings every 1-3 months, or after 10 uses or so, to make sure they’re in good shape.
  1. Take the bearings out of the wheels using a bearing remover. Push the tip of the bearing remover tool into the middle of a wheel while you press the button on the back of the tool. This will remove the bearing from the wheel. Let go of the button, then pull the tool back out to get the bearing out of the way. For each wheel, do this. [4]
  • Keep the bearings out when you clean roller skates or inline skates so you don’t get them wet when you wash the wheels. This way, you won’t get them dirty.
  • A bearing remover can be bought at a skate shop or on the web.
  1. Soak the wheels in a container full of soapy water. All of the wheels should be submerged in a container of water and 2-3 drops of liquid dish detergent should be added to the water to clean them. Do this a few times to get the water to get the wheels clean. Wait until the dirt on their wheels starts to come off. Then, rinse them with clean water.
  • You can spray some window cleaner on the wheels and wipe them clean with a paper towel instead of having to soak them. This can also be done with the skates’ wheels.
  1. Wipe the wheels down with a damp paper towel and dry them off. Use paper towels to wipe down each wheel one at a time after they’ve been in the water. Using more dry paper towels, wipe off all the moisture from each wheel. Make sure all your wheels are clean and dry before you put your skates back together.
  • The old toothbrush can be used to scrub off any dirt that didn’t come off during the soaking process.
  1. Use Bearing Wash to clean and grease the bearings. Put the bearings in a small container with a lid. Cover them with bearing wash and put the lid on. It is time to wash the bearings. Put on the lid and shake the container very hard. Keep your clothes clean and dry your clothes with a clean, lint-free cloth. Each bearing should be lubricated with 1 drop of bearing oil.
  • You can buy both bearing wash and bearing lube at a skate shop or buy them on the internet.
  1. Put the bearings in the wheels, then put the wheels back on your skates and skate. When you get your bearing tool, you can put the bearings back in each wheel again. When you’re done, tighten the nuts or bolts back into place with your wrench or hex key.
  • It’s easy to change the wheels on your skates. They can go back to where they were. Put them on in a different order than they were before. This will help keep the wheels from getting worn down.
  • With your fingers, give each wheel a spin. Make sure they can move freely. As a last resort, you can just loosen the nut or bolt on that wheel by about 1/4 turn. This will give that wheel more freedom.

How to clean bearings with household items?

how to clean skateboard bearings

Every two to three months, as a roller hockey player, you should clean the bearings on your skates. It doesn’t take a lot of mechanical know-how to do this job either. Inline skate wheels can be cleaned at home with a little patience and the right tools. Before you do anything, make sure you have your tools, container, cleanser, and lubricant ready to go! Make sure you are working on a hard, non-porous surface before you start.

Clean your bearings with the help of the following things.

  • A work surface that is abrasive
  • A prying tool for the purpose of removing the bearing shields
  • A wheel tool with an inline design for removing the bearings
  • Purpose-built bearing cleaner and lubricant
  • A dry cloth or paper towel

When you want to clean your skate bearings, there are three simple steps you need to follow:

I.Skate Disassembly

1. Using an inline skate tool, remove the wheel from the skate.
Find two or three bolts that go through the middle of the skate wheel and the skate base. Skate tool: Put the end of the tool into the middle of the bolt and turn it counterclockwise. • An inline skate tool is a long, T-shaped piece of equipment with a strong handle and a thin, 4-mm-wide Allen wrench. You should be able to loosen and remove the bolts with little work. Some skate shops have them for sale. You can also buy them online.

  • If the wheel is held in place by two separate bolts, use two skate tools at the same time.
  • Keep the bolts in a separate container so they don’t get mixed up and get lost.

2. With the long end of your skate tool, pull the first bearing out of the wheel.
With one hand, hold the skate tool and the wheel. Tilt the skate tool 45 degrees and insert it into the center of the wheel with the blade facing the wheel itself. Use the tool’s long end to find the opposite side of the bearing. When that’s done, move the skate tool around a little bit so that the bearing comes out of the wheel. You can also use an in-line skate tool to take your bearings out of your skates. These are three-pronged tools for skates.
3. Take the spacer out of the center of the wheel, then put the wheel back on.
Examine your bearings for a small piece of metal that looks like a tube. You can use this to keep your skate wheels from sticking together when you change the axles. To get the spacer out, turn the wheel over and gently shake it out until it comes out.

  • Make sure that you separate the spacer from your screws.

4. Using the base of your skate tool, pry the second bearing off your wheel.
The skate tool was pushed through the hole in the wheel that was left when the bearing was removed at the start of the process. This is how to fix the skate tool: With your palm, firmly push on the handle of the skate tool. This should make the second bearing come straight out.
5. Use a thumbtack to remove the rubber bearing shields.
Rubber shields come in a specific color and fit very well around the outside of the bearing. You can use a thumbtack as a lever by putting the sharp end into the edge of the shield. Some time soon, the rubber shield should separate from the other parts of the bearing.
Remove the bearing shields from your other tools, like spacers and screws, so that you can work on them on their own.
6. With a thin, sharp tool, remove the C-ring to remove the metal bearing shields.
You can see it on the edge of the bearing. It’s made of metal, and it’s in the shape of a “C.”. Pry the ring open with the sharp end of the pointy tool and tap the bearing on a hard surface to dislodge the metal shield.

  • A thumbtack is an excellent tool for this.
  • Certain metal bearing shields may be sealed, making removal difficult. If such is the case, you may skip this step.

II.Bearing Soaking and Lubrication

  1. Fill an empty jar with your bearings.

Take a clean jar big enough to accommodate all of your bearings. It makes no difference whether they are face-up or face-down, as long as the bottom is flat.

  • Alternatively, an empty milk jug works nicely for this.
  1. Use a specific bearing cleaning to coat the bearings.

Directly over the bearings, pour the cleaner until they are totally saturated and immersed. You are not required to completely fill the container.

  • Clean skate bearings using a product formulated exclusively for skate bearings. This item is available for purchase online or at a dedicated skate store.
  1. Jiggle the jar to thoroughly clean your bearings.

Secure the lid of the jar firmly. Then, shake the jar vigorously. Continue shaking the jar until the cleaner seems dirty and grimy—this is a good indication that you’ve displaced a significant amount of dirt, oil, and grease. Then, pour out the used cleaning liquid, refill the jar, and shake vigorously again until the liquid remains clear.

  1. Empty the cleaner of the bearings and place them on a paper towel.

Put on gloves to avoid direct contact with the cleaning agents. After that, place all of the clean bearings on the paper towel.

  • Alternatively, you may lift and slide the clean bearings out of the jar using a thin, sharp item.
  1. Spin and tap your bearings to ensure they are free of debris.

Between your thumb and pointer finger, grasp each bearing. Begin rotating the wheel with your opposite pointer finger—ideally, the bearing should spin smoothly and freely. While you’re at it, tap the bearing on the paper towel to remove any remaining dirt, oil, or grease.

  1. Using a cloth and an air compressor, dry your clean bearings.

All bearings should be laid flat on the paper towel. Using a clean cloth, pat each bearing dry, and then spray a can of pressurized air straight into and around each bearing.

  1. Fill each bearing with 1-2 drops of bearing oil.

Then, using your fingers, rotate the bearings around to distribute the oil more evenly.

  • Bearing oil aids in the smooth operation of your bearings.
  • Skate bearing oil may be purchased online or at a speciality skate shop.

III.Reconstitution the Skates

  1. Replace the rubber protection above the bearing.

The seal should be centered squarely on top of the bearing, aligned with the grooves and edges. Then, using your fingers, firmly put the shield into place.

  1. On top of the metallic shield, replace it with the C-ring.

On top of the skate bearing, place the metallic ring. Then, reattach the C-ring to the top edge.

  1. Using your thumbs, insert the first bearing into the wheel.

With the bearing shield facing up, place it at the center of the wheel. Put your thumbs on each side of the bearing and firmly press to reinstall it.

If the bearing does not fully engage, use your skate tool to press it into position.

  1. Flip the wheel over and center the spacer.

Ascertain that the spacer is upright and sitting along the first bearing’s center.

  1. Using your thumbs, press the second bearing into position.

Place the bearing on the spacer, centered in the wheel. As previously, use your thumbs to reposition the bearing.

  1. Using bolts and a skate tool, reattach the wheel to your skate.

Reinstall the wheel in its appropriate location on your skate. With your skate tool (or skate tools), re-twist the bolts into place until the wheel feels snug and secure. As a last check, use your finger to spin the wheel to ensure that everything is operating properly.

  • Some skaters propose grouping your wheels according to their spin speed; in other words, place the slowest spinning wheels beside the quickest spinning wheels.